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Author Topic: 3-Foot Clearance Law  (Read 4057 times)

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Offline Forum Manager

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3-Foot Clearance Law
« on: October 01, 2006, 02:20:43 PM »
Starting Oct. 1, 2006 a new Florida law requires vehicles to pass bicycles and other nonmotorized vehicles with at least a 3-foot clearance.

The law that motorists are supposed to leave at least three feet of space between their cars and bicyclists when passing takes effect October 1, 2006.

I've heard that some people think the three-foot law will be hard to enforce.

Just take a long piece of wire or other material and tape it to the bike handlebars.  Measure the wire so that three feet of it sticks out to the left.  When a car brushes closer than three feet, the wire will slide across the car.  Instant traffic citation.

Make sure the wire is taped loose enough that the wire easily slides off the handlebars so the wire doesn't catch on the car and yank the handlebars.

Thanks,
Kimberly Cooper

Florida Bicycle Association
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Offline Forum Manager

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Re: 3-Foot Clearance Law
« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2006, 04:56:39 PM »
Here is an article from TBO <-- Click this link to open Tampa Bay Online

Bikers Beware: Dangers Increase In Fall
Skip directly to the full story.

By JO-ANN JOHNSTON

Published: Nov 26, 2006

With dusk falling early, it is one of the most hazardous times of the year for bicycle riders and motorists sharing Pasco roads. Workers pedal home from stores and restaurants, construction sites and orange groves; children from after-school activities. The danger of collision increases. And roadways lacking shoulders or streetlights are especially perilous. Recreational cyclists often use reflectors and lights, but people who must ride bikes for basic transportation, such as migrants, usually can't afford such safeguards. Proceed with caution.

KNOW THE RULES

The 3-foot rule applies any time you pass a bike.

Estimate a safe distance by allowing a cyclist about one-third of a lane - about the size of your vehicle door, when fully open.

Drivers can be ticketed for ignoring the new passing law, with fines ranging from $115 to $120.

A ticket also can result in points on your license.

Law enforcement officers can issue a ticket when there has been an accident or whenever the officer has simply witnessed unsafe passing by the driver.

WHAT CAN GO WRONG

Bicyclists hit by cars can suffer fractured skulls, broken wrists, ankles or legs or ruptured spleens.

Last year, 115 bicyclists were injured in Pasco County accidents; one person died.

In 2000, 91 people were injured; no fatalities were reported.

NEW LAW IN FORCE

This year, the Legislature passed a law aimed at making Florida roads safer for bicyclists. As of Oct. 1, drivers must allow for a 3-foot buffer when passing bicyclists - a higher standard than the "safe distance" previously required. Safety advocates are eager to spread the word about the new law and related precautions.

ROAD SENSE FOR BIKERS

Wear a helmet. It's legally required for riders 16 and younger anyway.

Helmet prices at discount stores range from $14 to $40, depending on the safety features and age of the riders.

Put a red light/reflector on the rear of the bike and a white light/reflector on the front, as required by Florida law. A set of both costs about $14 in discount stores.

Wear bright colors and reflective garments

Be especially careful when riding into crosswalks from sidewalks - a common site of collisions between motorists making turns and cyclists.

Sources: Florida Highway Patrol Trooper Larry E. Coggins Jr.; Dr. Venugopal Palani, director of emergency medicine at Pasco Regional Medical Center, Dade City; Chris Hagelin, research associate. Center for Urban Transportation Research, University of South Florida, Tampa.

Reporting by JO-ANN JOHNSTON

Tribune staff writer
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Offline heart99

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Re: 3-Foot Clearance Law
« Reply #2 on: June 12, 2009, 03:22:47 AM »
Starting Oct. 1, 2006 a new Florida law requires vehicles to pass bicycles and other nonmotorized vehicles with at least a 3-foot clearance.

The law that motorists are supposed to leave at least three feet of space between their cars and bicyclists when passing takes effect October 1, 2006.

I've heard that some people think the three-foot law will be hard to enforce.

Just take a long piece of wire or other material and tape it to the bike handlebars.  Measure the wire so that three feet of it sticks out to the left.  When a car brushes closer than three feet, the wire will slide across the car.  Instant traffic citation.

Make sure the wire is taped loose enough that the wire easily slides off the handlebars so the wire doesn't catch on the car and yank the handlebars.

Thanks,
Kimberly Cooper

Florida Bicycle Association




The law that motorists are supposed to leave at least three feet of space between their cars and bicyclists when passing. But some people think the three-foot law will be hard to enforce.




_________________
California Orange County Lawyer

Offline old gray goat

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Re: 3-Foot Clearance Law
« Reply #3 on: June 12, 2009, 06:14:16 AM »
You think!!
 In fla were happy if we get the 6 inch white line.

Offline FACTORe

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Re: 3-Foot Clearance Law
« Reply #4 on: June 12, 2009, 07:14:22 AM »
I have been hit by a car this month already - and I was in a bike lane - no crash....just damage to the car that pushed me off the road.

Offline Darrinw2001

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Re: 3-Foot Clearance Law
« Reply #5 on: June 12, 2009, 07:52:07 AM »
One of the main reasons my son and I ride off-road. Also, the reason I will never own a motorcycle even again. I was run off the road 3 times on my Motorcycle, and almost hit twice on a Bike. I will not risk my kids life, or mine ever again riding on the road in anything other than a car. 

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Re: 3-Foot Clearance Law
« Reply #6 on: June 12, 2009, 07:57:54 AM »
Sweet thread revival! Nice work...

Offline Redriderpro

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Re: 3-Foot Clearance Law
« Reply #7 on: June 12, 2009, 08:07:07 AM »
I suspect this law is about as enforceable as the other 3' rule, the one someone might expect to follow when visiting the Mons Venus.
 
Probably will be broken about as much too.
 
Ride safe, ride in the woods,
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Offline firebiker

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Re: 3-Foot Clearance Law
« Reply #8 on: June 12, 2009, 08:09:11 AM »
I suspect this law is about as enforceable as the other 3' rule, the one someone might expect to follow when visiting the Mons Venus.
 
Probably will be broken about as much too.
 
Ride safe, ride in the woods,

I opened this thinking that's what is was about.  :)
My bike is more than a toy; it's my vessel.

 

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