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Author Topic: The art of falling  (Read 8066 times)

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Offline noble

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The art of falling
« on: October 29, 2007, 10:32:28 AM »
There is a def art to falling. Proper ways to do it and bad ways to do it. Having fallen a lot in my years I have become quite good at it! ;D But seriously, falling the right way makes a huge difference.

Thoughts?
Mike Cole

Offline Gregg

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Re: The art of falling
« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2007, 10:37:01 AM »
Tuck and Roll, baby!!!!!.................Wear a helmet too!!!

Offline Jason & Nancy Daniels

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Re: The art of falling
« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2007, 01:53:21 PM »
Just curious... speaking of falling... I took a mighty spill Sunday at Alafia. I was going a little to fast on a trail that I was completely unfamiliar with. Anyway, I went over the bars and rolled out with only a few scratches and a nice-sized lump on my inner thigh. Interestingly, I had just re-read an article about falling where you use your arms to control the direction of the fall, but you allow your elbows to bend so you don't bust a collarbone. Then you roll over a shoulder to dissipate the forward momentum. I would say that in a "def art" sense, my fall would not fall into a "classical master" category, but hey, no broken bones, and I was able to keep riding -- the hallmark of a good fall in my book!!

A question arose though as a result of my fall -- the insides of my helmet "broke free." The part that came loose was not the actual helmet, padding, or foam, but the plastic part that tightens around my head. It appeared to come apart toward the front where each side has what looks like a breakaway connection. I could pop the pieces back in place, and my helmet feels just like new (i.e. I can tighten it without it popping out). I think I might've heard somewhere that you should replace your helmet if you take a hard hit, but I'm not sure... does anyone have a thought on this?

Thanks!

J
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Offline Jimbo

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Re: The art of falling
« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2007, 02:45:22 PM »
Definitely replace the helmet if it's taken a hard hit.  I cracked a previous helmet on a fat tree limb that was hanging low a while back.  It cracked the outer shell of the helmet.  Needless to say, I had to replace it.
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Offline Gregg

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Re: The art of falling
« Reply #4 on: October 29, 2007, 03:06:41 PM »
Jason,
Glad you are not hurt seriously. What kind of helmet do you have?

Offline Harvey

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Re: The art of falling
« Reply #5 on: October 29, 2007, 03:48:34 PM »
the insides of my helmet "broke free." The part that came loose was not the actual helmet, padding, or foam, but the plastic part that tightens around my head. It appeared to come apart toward the front where each side has what looks like a breakaway connection. I could pop the pieces back in place, and my helmet feels just like new (i.e. I can tighten it without it popping out).

Sounds to me like it's the part where the retention system wraps around the back of your head to the side and snaps into the helmet (Like Giro's Roc Loc). If that's the case, you're fine. They're supposed to be removable so you can replace them if needed.

Offline Jason & Nancy Daniels

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Re: The art of falling
« Reply #6 on: October 29, 2007, 07:38:22 PM »
Greg, it is a Trek Vapor 3... which I didn't know off the top of my, ahem, head... sorry ;-). Anyway, because I had to look at my helmet to get the model to answer your quesiton, I ran across this little tidbit:

"...this helmet may, after an impact, be damaged behond the point of adequately protecting against further impacts and the damage may not be visually apparent. If this helmet is impacted, immediately discontinue further use and return it to the manufacturer: or destroy and replace..."

I guess a replacement is in order.

So my next question is this... what advice does anyone have for destroying a helmet?  ;D ;D ;D ;D
Jason Daniels
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Offline steve

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Re: The art of falling
« Reply #7 on: October 29, 2007, 08:27:06 PM »
Just use your head on that one  ;D

Offline noble

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Re: The art of falling
« Reply #8 on: October 29, 2007, 09:38:33 PM »
Gregg--I caught your helmet comment.   
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Offline Gregg

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Re: The art of falling
« Reply #9 on: October 29, 2007, 09:50:49 PM »
Greg, it is a Trek Vapor 3... which I didn't know off the top of my, ahem, head... sorry ;-). Anyway, because I had to look at my helmet to get the model to answer your quesiton, I ran across this little tidbit:

"...this helmet may, after an impact, be damaged behond the point of adequately protecting against further impacts and the damage may not be visually apparent. If this helmet is impacted, immediately discontinue further use and return it to the manufacturer: or destroy and replace..."

I guess a replacement is in order.

So my next question is this... what advice does anyone have for destroying a helmet?  ;D ;D ;D ;D

Strap 4 sticks of dynamite to your chest, Fasten helmet securely to your head, bend over....................


Seriously though, take it to the dealer you bought it from, you will probably get some sort of credit for it.


Noble, I am glad you caught that.....it was meant for you!!!! ;D ;D ;D


Offline noble

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Re: The art of falling
« Reply #10 on: October 30, 2007, 01:34:39 PM »
I knew it was for me--but it ain't gonna work!

I hate helmets. I used to skateboard on vert ramps with no helmet--the art of falling comes in handy for not hitting your head.
Mike Cole

Offline Harvey

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Re: The art of falling
« Reply #11 on: October 30, 2007, 03:37:00 PM »
the art of falling comes in handy for not hitting your head.

I've always thought I was a really good "crasher". I've always been able to re-live every instant of my bigger crashes, remembering things that I did during the crash that minimized the impact.

I always wondered how people could faceplant without getting their hands up in front of their face. Then it happened to me about a year ago: JRA, then piledriving into the ground in a nanosecond. :o  Oddly enough, the only lingering injury from that crash was from a jammed finger while trying to get my hands in front of my face. The reaction happened without thinking, but it happened so fast I didn't have time to protect my face.

Offline noble

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Re: The art of falling
« Reply #12 on: October 30, 2007, 03:45:48 PM »
Knowing your own limitations in general and in certain conditions can make a big difference.  Knowing when and where to push it is important in itself.
Mike Cole

Offline Gregg

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Re: The art of falling
« Reply #13 on: October 30, 2007, 03:53:40 PM »
Being realistic and understanding that you don't control every variable is important too!

I would hate to hear that you cracked your head while riding. Somtimes it is not you that screws up, it can be an equipment failure, or something else. 

I broke my leg without crashing. Sh*t happens.  No I don't wear leg protection now, but you don't have to worrie about become a vegetable with a bum leg.

Do you wear a seat belt in the car?

Offline slowfatguy

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Re: The art of falling
« Reply #14 on: October 30, 2007, 07:02:01 PM »
Nobody in their right mind should ride without a helmet. You can try to justify it all you want. I don't want to loose our trails because a squirrel jumped into your wheel causing you to crash a break your head resulting in your death and then your family decided to sue the state over it. Sounds kinda stupid, but it has happened before.
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