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Offline StonePony

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SS advice
« on: January 31, 2009, 09:56:48 AM »
Hey guys.  Ok, so I'm looking to get into the single speed game, and am wondering if I could get some advice from those who have some experience in this area.  Some of the questions I've got are probably the fairly common ones you would expect, but here they are:
- Build or buy?
- Which bike/frame manufacturers are the primary players in this space?
- If buying rather than building, is there a general consensus on the brand that provides the best bang for the buck?
- Gearing and ratios?  I've heard that 2:1 (e.g., 32x16 for example) is the *standard* build, but is that the right place to start (will initially be riding mostly at Croom)
- Since at some point I'll be riding more technical terrain, I'm thinking that a freewheeling rig is better than a fixed.  Is that the right assumption?
- It seems that a lot of the SS riders are moving to 29er's, is this something I should consider from the start as well?
- Front shock.  I'm assuming that this is probably what *most* people prefer, but I see a couple of popular models out there that are rigid.  Thoughts?

That's probably it for now, I certainly appreciate any feedback -- thanks in advance!

Offline Jim DeLuca

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Re: SS advice
« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2009, 11:27:51 AM »
Definitely want to go 29er.  A build is the way to go if you want to make the investment.  As far as gearing, it depends on where your riding and how good of shape your in.  Mine I have used rigid and really didn't see it as an issue at Boyette, but Alafia and Flatwoods it was way to harsh.  I have Redline up for sale right now, and I have it priced well below what it is worth!  Anyway, it's a nice bike for the price to see if you like riding an SS, and if you decide to build later you can always move the components over.

Offline StonePony

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Re: SS advice
« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2009, 12:25:45 PM »
Definitely want to go 29er.  A build is the way to go if you want to make the investment.  As far as gearing, it depends on where your riding and how good of shape your in.  Mine I have used rigid and really didn't see it as an issue at Boyette, but Alafia and Flatwoods it was way to harsh.  I have Redline up for sale right now, and I have it priced well below what it is worth!  Anyway, it's a nice bike for the price to see if you like riding an SS, and if you decide to build later you can always move the components over.
Thanks JM, good info.  Question:  I saw your Redline, and it's a nice looking bike.  I notice it's a 19" frame -- I'm about 5-10" (maybe a little taller) - is that going to be too big for me?  I know a *typically* good frame size for me is in the 17-18 area, but curious to get your thoughts.

Offline Jim DeLuca

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Re: SS advice
« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2009, 02:02:15 PM »
It depends....I'm 5' 8" and ride a 19" comfortably.  I have a 17" Rockhopper frame on my other bike and it is to small I feel very cramped and had to get an extended seat post to be semi comfortable.  I would say without getting into bike fitting.  A 17" frame would be way to small for ya.  If your going to the club ride tomorrow, I'll bring it, and your more than welcome to take it for a spin if I still have it.    Like I said, its a cheap way to get an SS to see if you want your main bike to be an SS.  The SS is not for everyone, and I would caution anyone not to go out and wrap up 1000.00 plus to find out its not for them.  Hey, I'm going back to gears, and Ive heard of others doing the same thing.  If I wasn't crunching dollars to get the parts for my build I wouldn't sell it, and keep it as a second bike, as it is fun to ride.  It's a blast riding out at Boyette especially on the Abyss's Let me know. 

Offline slowfatguy

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Re: SS advice
« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2009, 04:44:41 PM »
you couldn't give me a 29'er. ;D
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Offline Jim DeLuca

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Re: SS advice
« Reply #5 on: January 31, 2009, 04:49:11 PM »
you couldn't give me a 29'er. ;D

In case someone offers you one I'll gladly take it off your hands!  :)

Offline Dave In Odessa

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Re: SS advice
« Reply #6 on: January 31, 2009, 06:31:25 PM »
I'm 6-2 and ride a 19" Redline Monocog Flight 29er.  It is such an awesome bike!  It really put the fun back into biking for me.  It is a very good value too as far as my research. 
07 Redline Monocog Flight 29'er 1x9 (The Snot Rocket)
07 Iron Horse Warrior 1.3 (The One That Started It All)

Offline StonePony

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Re: SS advice
« Reply #7 on: January 31, 2009, 08:05:46 PM »
It depends....I'm 5' 8" and ride a 19" comfortably.  I have a 17" Rockhopper frame on my other bike and it is to small I feel very cramped and had to get an extended seat post to be semi comfortable.  I would say without getting into bike fitting.  A 17" frame would be way to small for ya.  If your going to the club ride tomorrow, I'll bring it, and your more than welcome to take it for a spin if I still have it.    Like I said, its a cheap way to get an SS to see if you want your main bike to be an SS.  The SS is not for everyone, and I would caution anyone not to go out and wrap up 1000.00 plus to find out its not for them.  Hey, I'm going back to gears, and Ive heard of others doing the same thing.  If I wasn't crunching dollars to get the parts for my build I wouldn't sell it, and keep it as a second bike, as it is fun to ride.  It's a blast riding out at Boyette especially on the Abyss's Let me know. 
Hmmm, ok thanks.  I won't be at the ride tomorrow as that would cause my wife to empty a clip into the side of my car as I attempted to go there (she's been promised some *attention* tomorrow lol), however I might take you up on the offer to take it for a spin if it doesn't get sold first.  Let me do a little more general digging on the internet first and get back to you.

Offline Jim DeLuca

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Re: SS advice
« Reply #8 on: January 31, 2009, 09:04:28 PM »
Just let me know. As long as I have it your welcome to take it for a spin.  I don't foresee it selling anytime soon, and I'm not gonna go any lower on price....Already losing my butt on it as it is.  Might even ride it tomorrow see how the brakes work. I gotta tough ride tomorrow with the youth group.

Offline treadlight

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Re: SS advice
« Reply #9 on: February 02, 2009, 09:47:09 AM »
Hey guys.  Ok, so I'm looking to get into the single speed game, and am wondering if I could get some advice from those who have some experience in this area.  Some of the questions I've got are probably the fairly common ones you would expect, but here they are:
- Build or buy?
- Which bike/frame manufacturers are the primary players in this space?
- If buying rather than building, is there a general consensus on the brand that provides the best bang for the buck?
- Gearing and ratios?  I've heard that 2:1 (e.g., 32x16 for example) is the *standard* build, but is that the right place to start (will initially be riding mostly at Croom)
- Since at some point I'll be riding more technical terrain, I'm thinking that a freewheeling rig is better than a fixed.  Is that the right assumption?
- It seems that a lot of the SS riders are moving to 29er's, is this something I should consider from the start as well?
- Front shock.  I'm assuming that this is probably what *most* people prefer, but I see a couple of popular models out there that are rigid.  Thoughts?

That's probably it for now, I certainly appreciate any feedback -- thanks in advance!

If someone asks to "build or buy" chances are you better off buying a complete bike. Cheaper and easier.
Singlespeed is not for everybody, one gear is slower than multi-gear and is a very hard work to keep up with your riding buddies, I suggest to buy a used either 26er or 29er.
I suggest to use a front fork, rigid is harsh regardless if you decide to get into 29er, you will ride longer and stronger with a front squish.

morisson

Offline Marcel Aguirre

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Re: SS advice
« Reply #10 on: February 02, 2009, 09:49:20 AM »
My humbled and slightly slanted opinion.   But first of all, ride whatever you feel comfortable with and make sure you have fun with it.  If you don't have fun with it, it is not for you.

- Build or buy?
Does not matter but build your own is always fun and great learning opportunity regarless of how many gears you use.

- Which bike/frame manufacturers are the primary players in this space?
There is ONLY one:  VASSAGO...  Just kidding there are many good ones.  I have only ridden (and liked) Vassago, and Redline.

- If buying rather than building, is there a general consensus on the brand that provides the best bang for the buck?
If you going SS and rigid, you should be able to find very nice full bikes for about $700.  Throw in a fork and discbrakes and you're looking at a $1500 bike.  That may be "middle of the road" for new bikes though.  Tons of used or slighly used for much much less.  And tons of full bling bling for more.  Just depends on how deep your pockets are for quality parts that will give you most bang.

- Gearing and ratios?  I've heard that 2:1 (e.g., 32x16 for example) is the *standard* build, but is that the right place to start (will initially be riding mostly at Croom)
This is where I play dumb with all the number cruncher tecquie wannabes... I pedal whatever gear I feel comfortable with and I have fun with.  32x18 for 29er seem to be standard.  You can push that gear just about everywhere around here.  Maybe a 19 or 20 at Alafia and if you going to do reds at Carter or Santos.  Don't know about SS 26er since I never ridden one.

- Since at some point I'll be riding more technical terrain, I'm thinking that a freewheeling rig is better than a fixed.  Is that the right assumption?
YES!  Leave the fixied for the low IQ folks... (hahaha.. j/k)

- It seems that a lot of the SS riders are moving to 29er's, is this something I should consider from the start as well?
Of course!  But again, ride what you will have the most fun with.  Why not both?  Just don't go 69 or 96 weirdo stuff.

- Front shock.  I'm assuming that this is probably what *most* people prefer, but I see a couple of popular models out there that are rigid.  Thoughts?Rigid is for low IQ folks... again, just kidding.. I rode ridig for about 3 months.  After a night ride at the bumpy rooty flatwoods, I realized I needed a front fork so I could take my hand off the handle bars to reach for bottles while riding at night rigid.  I have not ridden rigid since but I might do it again if I get an extra frame.

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Re: SS advice
« Reply #11 on: February 02, 2009, 09:52:04 AM »
My humbled and slightly slanted opinion.   But first of all, ride whatever you feel comfortable with and make sure you have fun with it.  If you don't have fun with it, it is not for you.

- Build or buy?
Does not matter but build your own is always fun and great learning opportunity regarless of how many gears you use.

- Which bike/frame manufacturers are the primary players in this space?
There is ONLY one:  VASSAGO...  Just kidding there are many good ones.  I have only ridden (and liked) Vassago, and Redline.

- If buying rather than building, is there a general consensus on the brand that provides the best bang for the buck?
If you going SS and rigid, you should be able to find very nice full bikes for about $700.  Throw in a fork and discbrakes and you're looking at a $1500 bike.  That may be "middle of the road" for new bikes though.  Tons of used or slighly used for much much less.  And tons of full bling bling for more.  Just depends on how deep your pockets are for quality parts that will give you most bang.

- Gearing and ratios?  I've heard that 2:1 (e.g., 32x16 for example) is the *standard* build, but is that the right place to start (will initially be riding mostly at Croom)
This is where I play dumb with all the number cruncher tecquie wannabes... I pedal whatever gear I feel comfortable with and I have fun with.  32x18 for 29er seem to be standard.  You can push that gear just about everywhere around here.  Maybe a 19 or 20 at Alafia and if you going to do reds at Carter or Santos.  Don't know about SS 26er since I never ridden one.

- Since at some point I'll be riding more technical terrain, I'm thinking that a freewheeling rig is better than a fixed.  Is that the right assumption?
YES!  Leave the fixied for the low IQ folks... (hahaha.. j/k)

- It seems that a lot of the SS riders are moving to 29er's, is this something I should consider from the start as well?
Of course!  But again, ride what you will have the most fun with.  Why not both?  Just don't go 69 or 96 weirdo stuff.

- Front shock.  I'm assuming that this is probably what *most* people prefer, but I see a couple of popular models out there that are rigid.  Thoughts?Rigid is for low IQ folks... again, just kidding.. I rode ridig for about 3 months.  After a night ride at the bumpy rooty flatwoods, I realized I needed a front fork so I could take my hand off the handle bars to reach for bottles while riding at night rigid.  I have not ridden rigid since but I might do it again if I get an extra frame.

i may have a low iq, but I LOOK GOOD!

Offline StonePony

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Re: SS advice
« Reply #12 on: February 02, 2009, 09:56:29 AM »
If someone asks to "build or buy" chances are you better off buying a complete bike. Cheaper and easier.
Singlespeed is not for everybody, one gear is slower than multi-gear and is a very hard work to keep up with your riding buddies, I suggest to buy a used either 26er or 29er.
I suggest to use a front fork, rigid is harsh regardless if you decide to get into 29er, you will ride longer and stronger with a front squish.

morisson

Ok, thanks.  I'm leaning toward buy versus build (mainly because to your point -- I really don't have much spare time and might be too impatient to go thru the build process at the moment as a result).

Offline treadlight

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Re: SS advice
« Reply #13 on: February 02, 2009, 09:58:55 AM »
My humbled and slightly slanted opinion.   But first of all, ride whatever you feel comfortable with and make sure you have fun with it.  If you don't have fun with it, it is not for you.

- Build or buy?
Does not matter but build your own is always fun and great learning opportunity regarless of how many gears you use.

- Which bike/frame manufacturers are the primary players in this space?
There is ONLY one:  VASSAGO...  Just kidding there are many good ones.  I have only ridden (and liked) Vassago, and Redline.

- If buying rather than building, is there a general consensus on the brand that provides the best bang for the buck?
If you going SS and rigid, you should be able to find very nice full bikes for about $700.  Throw in a fork and discbrakes and you're looking at a $1500 bike.  That may be "middle of the road" for new bikes though.  Tons of used or slighly used for much much less.  And tons of full bling bling for more.  Just depends on how deep your pockets are for quality parts that will give you most bang.

- Gearing and ratios?  I've heard that 2:1 (e.g., 32x16 for example) is the *standard* build, but is that the right place to start (will initially be riding mostly at Croom)
This is where I play dumb with all the number cruncher tecquie wannabes... I pedal whatever gear I feel comfortable with and I have fun with.  32x18 for 29er seem to be standard.  You can push that gear just about everywhere around here.  Maybe a 19 or 20 at Alafia and if you going to do reds at Carter or Santos.  Don't know about SS 26er since I never ridden one.

- Since at some point I'll be riding more technical terrain, I'm thinking that a freewheeling rig is better than a fixed.  Is that the right assumption?
YES!  Leave the fixied for the low IQ folks... (hahaha.. j/k)

- It seems that a lot of the SS riders are moving to 29er's, is this something I should consider from the start as well?
Of course!  But again, ride what you will have the most fun with.  Why not both?  Just don't go 69 or 96 weirdo stuff.

- Front shock.  I'm assuming that this is probably what *most* people prefer, but I see a couple of popular models out there that are rigid.  Thoughts?Rigid is for low IQ folks... again, just kidding.. I rode ridig for about 3 months.  After a night ride at the bumpy rooty flatwoods, I realized I needed a front fork so I could take my hand off the handle bars to reach for bottles while riding at night rigid.  I have not ridden rigid since but I might do it again if I get an extra frame.

i may have a low iq, but I LOOK GOOD!

.....and yeah at the end of the day don't let anyone says otherwise what you should ride...its how you feel about yourself that COUNTS!!!

They might tell you "what a dumba**" riding a rigid and single speed (or fixie) on a extremely difficult trail" or "that is why low wages laborer create derailleur hangers and infinite gears" But listen to the inner you....do you want to follow the herd or be wild and explore (and at the process probably hurt yourslef ;D ) and have FUN.

morisson


Offline StonePony

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Re: SS advice
« Reply #14 on: February 02, 2009, 10:04:04 AM »
My humbled and slightly slanted opinion.   But first of all, ride whatever you feel comfortable with and make sure you have fun with it.  If you don't have fun with it, it is not for you.

- Build or buy?
Does not matter but build your own is always fun and great learning opportunity regarless of how many gears you use.

- Which bike/frame manufacturers are the primary players in this space?
There is ONLY one:  VASSAGO...  Just kidding there are many good ones.  I have only ridden (and liked) Vassago, and Redline.

- If buying rather than building, is there a general consensus on the brand that provides the best bang for the buck?
If you going SS and rigid, you should be able to find very nice full bikes for about $700.  Throw in a fork and discbrakes and you're looking at a $1500 bike.  That may be "middle of the road" for new bikes though.  Tons of used or slighly used for much much less.  And tons of full bling bling for more.  Just depends on how deep your pockets are for quality parts that will give you most bang.

- Gearing and ratios?  I've heard that 2:1 (e.g., 32x16 for example) is the *standard* build, but is that the right place to start (will initially be riding mostly at Croom)
This is where I play dumb with all the number cruncher tecquie wannabes... I pedal whatever gear I feel comfortable with and I have fun with.  32x18 for 29er seem to be standard.  You can push that gear just about everywhere around here.  Maybe a 19 or 20 at Alafia and if you going to do reds at Carter or Santos.  Don't know about SS 26er since I never ridden one.

- Since at some point I'll be riding more technical terrain, I'm thinking that a freewheeling rig is better than a fixed.  Is that the right assumption?
YES!  Leave the fixied for the low IQ folks... (hahaha.. j/k)

- It seems that a lot of the SS riders are moving to 29er's, is this something I should consider from the start as well?
Of course!  But again, ride what you will have the most fun with.  Why not both?  Just don't go 69 or 96 weirdo stuff.

- Front shock.  I'm assuming that this is probably what *most* people prefer, but I see a couple of popular models out there that are rigid.  Thoughts?Rigid is for low IQ folks... again, just kidding.. I rode ridig for about 3 months.  After a night ride at the bumpy rooty flatwoods, I realized I needed a front fork so I could take my hand off the handle bars to reach for bottles while riding at night rigid.  I have not ridden rigid since but I might do it again if I get an extra frame.
Great writeup -- many thanks.  I wish there was a shop up here (Spring Hill area) that had a SS I could take out for a spin, but so far no luck.  A couple of bike shops around, and the owners are nice guys, but it's basically a "if you want it then you need to order it" kind of deal.

What do you think of this rig?:  http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&item=370152613462

The guys says the bike is *not* a Turner, so I'm assuming it's probably a decal stuck on some other frame.  The components look pretty good though to my non-expert eyes.

 

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