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Author Topic: Hub repair?  (Read 1305 times)

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Offline Rockhopper

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Hub repair?
« on: March 28, 2009, 03:34:54 PM »
Hello - I was replacing my rear cassette and chain today. When I got the old cassette off, I tried to twist what I will call the axle. I don't know if that's what it's called. The thing that goes into the hub? It has two different sized bolts on each side of the wheel.
Anyway, when I twisted it it was pretty tight. I could turn it with my fingers, but it did not turn easily. It would catch a bit with each quarter turn. Is that norma? Should it turn easily? Should it turn at all? If it's broken, is there something I can do to fix it? Thanks for any advice.

Offline slowfatguy

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Re: Hub repair?
« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2009, 04:11:48 PM »
what kind of hub is it? I'd have to say that it doesn't sound normal though.
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Offline Rockhopper

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Re: Hub repair?
« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2009, 10:00:03 AM »
It's a Shimano hub on a Specialized Epic.

Offline slowfatguy

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Re: Hub repair?
« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2009, 10:22:27 AM »
I've never had a shimano hub, but no, that doesn't sound right to me. Maybe someone else will chime in, but I don't know if the bearings in that hub are replaceable.
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Offline $irWattZZZZ

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Re: Hub repair?
« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2009, 10:51:35 AM »
The Shimano hubs are of the cone and loose ball design, that is several individual ball bearings rather than a sealed cartridge bearing. When the grease is displaced or contaminated it will affect the smoothness with which the hub spins and if not addressed will eventually lead to premature wear on the face of the bearing race where the ball bearings ride. You will need a cone wrench which is a narrow wrench that allows you to get on the nut on either side of your hub to disassemble, inspect and repack your bearings with grease, make sure the race is not pitted or damaged before reassembly. It would probably be good to watch it being done the first time, the only thing that requires any thought is the final tolerance that you tighten those before mentioned nuts to, to tight and the bearings will bind or to loose and you will have flex or play in the hub neither condition good for the long term health of your hub :)

Offline catman

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Re: Hub repair?
« Reply #5 on: March 29, 2009, 11:44:52 AM »
The Shimano hubs are of the cone and loose ball design, that is several individual ball bearings rather than a sealed cartridge bearing. When the grease is displaced or contaminated it will affect the smoothness with which the hub spins and if not addressed will eventually lead to premature wear on the face of the bearing race where the ball bearings ride. You will need a cone wrench which is a narrow wrench that allows you to get on the nut on either side of your hub to disassemble, inspect and repack your bearings with grease, make sure the race is not pitted or damaged before reassembly. It would probably be good to watch it being done the first time, the only thing that requires any thought is the final tolerance that you tighten those before mentioned nuts to, to tight and the bearings will bind or to loose and you will have flex or play in the hub neither condition good for the long term health of your hub :)

I second everything he said and will add that you really need to lay the parts out in a uncluttered area exactly the way you removed them.
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