Sorry, you must be logged in to use the shoutbox!

Author Topic: Forward Vision  (Read 1558 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline jro

  • First Bike
  • *
  • Posts: 26
  • Karma: +7/-0
Forward Vision
« on: May 14, 2007, 10:08:08 AM »
I have just gotten back into riding and I learned the lesson of not looking forward the hard way.  I was riding rollercoaster and during one of the drops I focused on the roots to go over during the drop.  The next thing I see is a tree!!  My ribs and my pride are bruised but it was a lesson learned.  With the ribs the way they are I rode on Saturday on the easy trails and tried my best to keep my vision forward.  I was amazed at how many times I caught myself looking down, not just a quick look down but I was riding that way. 

If you have any suggestions on the best position for your head and eyes while riding I would like to hear about it, because as I tried to keep my head looking forward I found my back was telling me that it did not like this position.  No sharp pain it was just muscle like holding a weight to long.

Thanks

Offline FACTORe

  • Yellow Jersey
  • *****
  • Posts: 4092
  • Karma: +25/-477
  • Gender: Male
  • team - independent self supported
Re: Forward Vision
« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2007, 10:32:47 AM »
oakley needs to come out with a new pair of mountain biking glasses that have blinders on the bottom, where you are forced to look ahead and not down.

Offline slowfatguy

  • Yellow Jersey
  • *****
  • Posts: 1650
  • Karma: +89/-194
  • Gender: Male
Re: Forward Vision
« Reply #2 on: May 14, 2007, 12:40:46 PM »
I try to look out 15-20ft on average. It depends on the trail and how fast you are going though. It is a common thing for newer riders to do, and once you train yourself to look forward you'll be suprised how much better you'll ride.
Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.

Offline Gregg

  • Forum Moderator
  • Yellow Jersey
  • *****
  • Posts: 3130
  • Karma: +263/-205
  • Gender: Male
  • obsessed...............
  • My Bike: A Kouple of Kool Konas....and a new plastic Titus....
Re: Forward Vision
« Reply #3 on: May 14, 2007, 01:21:47 PM »
I agree 15 to 20 feet in front of you on a more open trail, maybe a little closer on a more tight trail.

Think about how you drive your car or truck. You are not looking at the tip of your car's nose, you are looking down the road. Your hand-eye coordination takes care of the rest, and just makes the car go where you are looking. It is really the same concept on a bike.

Pick the line and go. Hopefully you picked the right one ;D ;D!

Offline treadlight

  • Pinoy MTBer
  • Yellow Jersey
  • *****
  • Posts: 1236
  • Karma: +153/-81
  • Gender: Male
  • I love my bike and bike loves me.
    • Pinoy MTBer
  • My Bike: Redline Monocog, Niner Air9, Niner One9
Re: Forward Vision
« Reply #4 on: May 14, 2007, 01:37:50 PM »
I try to look out 15-20ft on average. It depends on the trail and how fast you are going though. It is a common thing for newer riders to do, and once you train yourself to look forward you'll be suprised how much better you'll ride.
Agree 100%. If you are riding at Moriss Bridge (trail = flat, obstacles = easy, none) you should be looking forward at least 15 feet ahead. When you are riding at Alafia (trail=drops, roots, obstacles=hard) you still have to scan and look forward to allow yourself enough time to pick the next line or bail out safely but there are also sections that you have to look down to plant your tire where you want it. If you still catching yourself looking down don't worry cuts & bruises will force you to look and scan forward  ;) jk. Try practicing at Flatwoods look ahead and let the bike go where it suppose to, try at low speed and increase as you fell comfortable.

Offline FACTORe

  • Yellow Jersey
  • *****
  • Posts: 4092
  • Karma: +25/-477
  • Gender: Male
  • team - independent self supported
Re: Forward Vision
« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2007, 01:42:14 PM »
i found that night riding sort of forces you to look 15-20 ahead if you focus your light that far ahead.  you learn to trust that your bike will go over what is right under you.  after a couple night rides i found myself looking down the trail more instead of looking at what it is too late to do anything about anyway.

Offline Gregg

  • Forum Moderator
  • Yellow Jersey
  • *****
  • Posts: 3130
  • Karma: +263/-205
  • Gender: Male
  • obsessed...............
  • My Bike: A Kouple of Kool Konas....and a new plastic Titus....
Re: Forward Vision
« Reply #6 on: May 14, 2007, 02:25:10 PM »
From Teadlight

"If you still catching yourself looking down don't worry cuts & bruises will force you to look and scan forward   jk.'


Pretty funny Tread  :D !

Actually they will have you looking upward at the sky and wondering "how did this happen?" and "crap, I hope no one saw that"

On a more serious note, Factoree had a great point night riding is what taught me to look further down the trail.

Offline Kevan

  • Assistant Wheel Spinner
  • Forum Moderator
  • Cycling Sherpa
  • *****
  • Posts: 344
  • Karma: +48/-3
  • Gender: Male
  • My Bike: Cannondale Scalpel 29er
Re: Forward Vision
« Reply #7 on: May 19, 2007, 10:11:44 PM »
If you have any suggestions on the best position for your head and eyes while riding I would like to hear about it, because as I tried to keep my head looking forward I found my back was telling me that it did not like this position.  No sharp pain it was just muscle like holding a weight to long.


I agree that Night riding with a helmet mounted light only is the best practice to keep you focus down the trail.  The added advantage of this approach is you also have to look down and around the trails on corners.  So you might be looking 15 feet down the trail and way to the left (or right) of your momentary direction of travel.

Look only where you want your tires to go and only look for a moment and look for the next place in your line of travel. 

Focus your helmet mounted light to point 15 to 20 feet down the trail while you are in your normal riding position.  This is like pointing the light to the trail just in front of the front tire of an imaginary bike in front of you. (or you can ride behind someone and see if your light lights the ground in front of their front tire)

Important:  Use your peripheral vision to watch out for low branches and other unwanted obstacles.
SWAMP Webmaster.  Have a question about SWAMP or the website?  Please contact me.

 

Advertisement: