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Offline firebiker

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bike issues
« on: June 04, 2007, 10:21:30 AM »
I don't claim to know alot adout the tech aspect of bikiing. I'm trying to learn though. So please excuse the ignorance. Besides a stretched chain, what could cause slip? Worn cogs possibly? They do look somewhat worn I've had it at the LBS a few times but it keeps happening. Also this is the 1st bike I've had w/ disc brakes. I keep noticing a low hum or whine and sometimes the lever feels real tight (rear). Any thoughts?
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Offline Marcel Aguirre

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Re: bike issues
« Reply #1 on: June 04, 2007, 10:55:48 AM »
First on the slip....  By "slip" do you mean your rear cassette just seems to spin freely as you spin the pedals or it "slips" as in when you shift (rear or front), the chain just seems to jump on/off the gear you are shifting into.  Resulting on having to move the shift trigger one more time to get it to catch?  If the first one, then you may have issues with the cassete/rear hub.  I think you mean the second one which could be several things.  If the teeth on your crank rings look like they are shark fins, then they are probably worn out. If they are bent (left/right) sticking out a bit, then you may just need a quick mallott put them back.  If you have a chain check tool, it will tell you if you need to replace the chain.  Are you lubing it and how often?  Are you cleaning all the greese/mud/dirt from chain, rings, cogs at lest once a week or so?.....  Give more detail.

On the low hum/whine noise...  Is this when you are braking or when you are just riding?  Turn the bike upside down and spin each weel with your hand.  Can you hear the noise?  If so, is it a constant noise or it goes and comes back?  Your rotor may be bent and is rubbing against the brake pads?  Or your rotor is dirty with oil/greese and is squeaks loud when you brake... depending on when the noise is heard.  As you spin the wheel, look at your rim and your disc rotor to make sure it is rotating without wobbles.  If wobbles, then your rotor or rim needs to be true or is warped.  Once you tell us which type you have, we can tell you several adjustment options.

On the lever being tight....   Do you mean that when you press it to brake, it doesn't take much effort to engage right away?  Or do you have to press it real tight, almost against the handle bars to get it to engage?  In either case, depending on the type of brakes/brake handles you have, it needs to be adjusted.  Let us know what type of bakes and brake handle you have.  They all have different adjustment options.



Offline Garry

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Re: bike issues
« Reply #2 on: June 04, 2007, 01:20:40 PM »
The slip could be from a worn drive train.  If you replace the chain - how old is it? - then replace the cassette as well.  I generally replace the middle chain ring every other time I replace the chain/cassette.  The middle ring gets the most use.  I have been trying more and more to use the other two rings as well just to distribute the use and wear.  Also, the slip could be from the palls inside the rear hub.  They might need lubing or replacing.  It is good to have these cleaned and lubed periodically to last longer.  If you ride often, and in dirty conditions then every 6 months to a year you should service the drive train.  After every ride clean it good to get as much dirt and grit out with a degreaser - AVOID GETTING IT IN THE HUB - then lube it with the proper lube for the conditions you'll be riding in.

Offline firebiker

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Re: bike issues
« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2007, 07:10:46 PM »
1)The chain is new. 2 rides. Same problem w/ old chain. I clean it after every ride. With only an occasional miss. By slip I mean it feels like the chain skips a cog. It is not coming out of gear. At first it seemed to happen on climbs or when I was pedaling hard but now it occurs more frequent. That's the best I can describe it. The cogs on the middle ring do appear worn to me. 
2)Juicy Fives- The noise occurs when "coasting" not pedaling or braking. I can't hear it when it's upside down. There are no wobbles in the wheel.
3)The brake engages early when pressed. They move a very, very small distance.
Thanks!
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Online chisel

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Re: bike issues
« Reply #4 on: June 04, 2007, 08:45:04 PM »
Worn cogs.

Offline Garry

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Re: bike issues
« Reply #5 on: June 04, 2007, 08:58:16 PM »
The chain is new, but did you swap out the cassette at the same time?  I know it's a pain to have to buy both, but it takes a lot of abuse.

Offline Gregg

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Re: bike issues
« Reply #6 on: June 04, 2007, 10:04:38 PM »
The tighness of the lever could be from accidently squeezing the lever while the wheel was off. I know how to fix this with Hayes HFX9 but not sure if the process is the same with the Juicys.

If you remove the brake shoes and gently push the pistons back with a flat head screw driver it will take care of the problem with the Hayes at least. Maybe one of you guys could shed light on if that would work with the Avids.

As far as the slipping goes, the guys are definitely right, you should always change rear cassette when you change the chain.

Gregg

Offline firebiker

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Re: bike issues
« Reply #7 on: June 04, 2007, 11:15:38 PM »
Thanks for the input everyone. I'll change out the rear cassettte. But what about the front? The middle ring looks to have the most wear.
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Online chisel

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Re: bike issues
« Reply #8 on: June 05, 2007, 06:36:36 AM »
I would change the middle ring too.

Offline EllsRider

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Re: bike issues
« Reply #9 on: June 05, 2007, 06:53:42 AM »
For meee, Its easy.  I just ride the big ring only!  Good advice from everybody. My experience has always been that you must change the cassette when you change the chain.  It never works trying to save a little. If you have sram up front,  the rings don't cost  that much. That XTR stuff will kep you brown bagging your lunch for  a month!  The brakes sound like they need to be bled.  Are they hyraulics? Not up on what a Avid 5 is.   Sandpine, I am saving your explanantions and i am copying/ pasting them into a bike maintenance book I'm going to sell!!  Good stuff. Keep it up!!    ;D
" Not this time, Lance"

Offline firebiker

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Re: bike issues
« Reply #10 on: June 05, 2007, 07:23:05 AM »
The Avid brakes are hydraulics.
p.s. I'll buy that book.
My bike is more than a toy; it's my vessel.

Offline Marcel Aguirre

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Re: bike issues
« Reply #11 on: June 05, 2007, 08:26:48 AM »
Just let me autograph it first.  Someone else will have to proofread cuz I can't spell worth penuts... LOL...

Besides what Gregg said on pushing back the pistons.... I don't think you need to bleed them.  You would normally have to bleed them if you press the brake pedal and it never engages the brakes.  THe lever would go all the way to the handle bar.  Usually that means you have air in the system and you need to bleed them.  Don't go there yet.  You may only need a simple lever adjustment.  Get yourself a 2 or 3 mm hex L and put it to the little screw undernet the lever.  Turn to the left so that piston that the level pushes to the inside of the master cylender eases off (backs up) a bit.  You probably need to turn it at least 3-4 times so that the pedal doesn't engage the brake right away and it doesn't feel "tight" as you described it.

Also, the rotor rubbing and if it is streight... tighten the two bolts that hold the caliper to your frame.  Unscrew each bolt 1/4 or 3/4 of a turn.  Squeeze your brake pedals 5-6 times and hold it tight on the last one.  While holding it, tighten your bolts with your other hand.  this will allow your caliper to center over the rotor.  Make sure your bolts have both washes that go with the bold.  Another simple adjustment you can do is change your skewer around.  When you close the skewer real tight, it could be pushing one side of your frame in more then the other. 

Good luck.

 

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